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Zoom Artist Bryan Lewis Saunders conducted a bizarre experiment. For several weeks, he took a different drug every day and made a portrait of himself under the influence.  The results are amazing and disturbing.  Click the picture to go to his website and see the pics.

Artist Bryan Lewis Saunders conducted a bizarre experiment. For several weeks, he took a different drug every day and made a portrait of himself under the influence.  The results are amazing and disturbing.  Click the picture to go to his website and see the pics.

08.06.13 0
Zoom Awesome.  That is all.

Awesome.  That is all.

07.20.13 1
Sitting on Catastrophe’s Knee

Penniless at the wishing well.

Sitting on catastrophe’s knee.

Airwaves full of the obvious.

Sky black above me.

I see in shades of gray.

I catch a glimpse of my silhouette.

It glares back at me with a bad attitude.

I hear voices in the shadows.

I wonder what is true.

I hear laughter.

I hear crying.

I see dancing.

I see dying.

Sometimes I know its you.

Copyright 2012 Jeff Drury

09.25.12 0
09.19.12 0
Zoom Ultimate Super Powers Chart.  I want this for my office. 

Ultimate Super Powers Chart.  I want this for my office. 

07.23.12 0
Zoom Tumblr as Commonplace Book.  Fascinating article about the use of Commonplace Books, think very old school Pinterest, Tumblr, Influence Maps, or Tapiture.  I’m actually starting my own Tumblr Commonplace Book.  You can find it at www.prodromalcommonplacebook.tumblr.com  

Tumblr as Commonplace Book.  Fascinating article about the use of Commonplace Books, think very old school Pinterest, Tumblr, Influence Maps, or Tapiture.  I’m actually starting my own Tumblr Commonplace Book.  You can find it at www.prodromalcommonplacebook.tumblr.com  

07.19.12 0
Heritage USA: From God Town to Ghost Town

iO9 had this link earlier today.  Heritage USA (founded by the infamous Jim Baker) used to be third most visited theme park in USA.  It now sits abandoned.  Check out these pictures that look like something out of a zombie apocalypse movie.  Click the title to check it out.

02.05.12 0
3:44 AM

I must be doing it wrong. I’ve tracked my own awakenings for years now and I wake up most at 4:27 AM.

01.03.12 0
Anxiety: Three Messages to Avoid Giving Kids (Charles Elliott, Ph.D.)

I couldn’t’ agree with this any more (click here to see the whole thing).

Kids don’t generally develop anxiety disorders all on their own. Oh sure, genes and biology have some influence, but these factors largely just predispose kids in the direction of acquiring problems with anxiety. The wrong messages can push both anxiously disposed kids as well as otherwise normal kids in the direction of struggling with anxiety for the rest of their lives.

If you’re a parent or someone who cares about kids, you just might want to know what type of messages instill insecurity. I’ll start by laying out three common mistakes that parents make; in other words, the kinds of messages you “don’t” want to give them: 

  1. Invalidating or Denying Your Children’s Feelings. If your kids seem worried, fearful, upset, or distraught, sometimes it’s tempting to tell them “there’s no reason that they should feel that way” or even that they “shouldn’t” be feeling what they are obviously feeling. Parents give these messages because they don’t want their kids to feel distress. So, they reason that their kids will understand, if their bad feelings have no real basis, they won’t feel the way they do. Big mistake. Children need to hear that it’s normal and OK to have a little fear or distress sometimes.
  2. Providing Incessant Reassurance. Messages that “everything will turn out OK” sound so very much like what you should tell kids, and if you don’t say them too often, there’ll probably be no problem. However, when you frequently reassure your kids, you end up giving them the message that they need to turn to you (as an adult or parent) to help them see that things will turn out alright. They fail to learn that they can get through fear on their own. We wrote about this issue in detail in our earlier book, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder For Dummies and if you find yourself reassuring your kids a lot, we urge you to read it.
  3. Protecting Your Kids from All Harm. No one ever wants to see a child come into harm’s way. However, growing, developing and learning require kids to face challenges and even take a few small risks along the way. Parents that try to constantly clear all dangers and risks that their kids confront teach them that the world is a scary place and that they need their parents to guide them through it. That message hardly fosters the independence and maturity they’ll need as adolescents and young adults.

So what’s a parent to do instead? One of the best ways to help prevent kids from developing anxiety disorders is to model how to cope.

I recommend that parents express when they’re feeling anxious and tell their kids how they plan to cope with it. For example, you might say, “Sometimes I feel nervous when I have to climb a ladder, but I just need to take a deep breath, be careful, and do it. If I get too nervous, I can always climb back down, but it feels good to get through difficult tasks.” Another good strategy is for parents to praise their kids when they make efforts to do things that are a little anxiety arousing for them.

The bottom line: Gently encourage your kids to confront their fears, let them know that a little anxiety is normal, and don’t try to keep them away from all challenges and risks.

12.14.11 401
Zoom 
Infographic of the Day: The nonprofit organization Environmental Working Group reviewed 84 popular kids breakfast cereals and found that a disturbing number of them contain a disturbing amount of sugar.
In fact, Kellogg’s Honey Smacks — which, funnily enough, was once called Sugar Smacks — contains more sugar in a one-cup serving than an entire Hostess Twinkie.
Kellogg’s vice president of nutrition Lisa Sutherland told NPR that Honey Smacks are not marketed to kids and are “seldom eaten by them.”
I’m crushed.  I always thought Froot Loops were good for me since they had fruit in them.  I guess the fact that they spelled fruit as “Froot” should have tipped me off.

Infographic of the Day: The nonprofit organization Environmental Working Group reviewed 84 popular kids breakfast cereals and found that a disturbing number of them contain a disturbing amount of sugar.

In fact, Kellogg’s Honey Smacks — which, funnily enough, was once called Sugar Smacks — contains more sugar in a one-cup serving than an entire Hostess Twinkie.

Kellogg’s vice president of nutrition Lisa Sutherland told NPR that Honey Smacks are not marketed to kids and are “seldom eaten by them.”

I’m crushed.  I always thought Froot Loops were good for me since they had fruit in them.  I guess the fact that they spelled fruit as “Froot” should have tipped me off.

12.10.11 2819
Zoom In honor (i.e. mockery) of Harold Camping (the guy who said the end of the world would be complete yesterday), I am reading “The Leftovers” by Tom Perrotta.  Clicking the link will take you to Stephen King’s review of the book.   

In honor (i.e. mockery) of Harold Camping (the guy who said the end of the world would be complete yesterday), I am reading “The Leftovers” by Tom Perrotta.  Clicking the link will take you to Stephen King’s review of the book.   

10.22.11 0
Zoom Now this song makes total sense.

Now this song makes total sense.

10.21.11 317
Facebook Posts Reveal Alcoholism Risk

This study may actually have found a true phenomenon, but we will never know for sure because nobody can find their friends’ Facebook posts anymore.

10.08.11 0
Honest Answer About UK Football

This pretty much sums up UK football!

10.01.11 0
Zoom How Men Vs. Women See Colors.

How Men Vs. Women See Colors.

09.17.11 0